1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Tua keep or not Tua keep...

Discussion in 'Miami Dolphins Forum' started by The_Dark_Knight, Jan 5, 2021.

  1. Jersey Dolfan

    Jersey Dolfan Active Member

    196
    137
    43
    Sep 9, 2012
    And you'll be crying for the next few years, with the rest of us.
     
  2. Jersey Dolfan

    Jersey Dolfan Active Member

    196
    137
    43
    Sep 9, 2012
    But Allen had all the physical tools. Once he got his mechanics and mind right, sky was the limit because he grew into his physical ability. Tua was supposed to be the finished product mentally and mechanically. But it's looking like he's far from it, but he's also maxed out physically. So what is he going to grow into with those limitations, and didn't we draft and invest too much in someone who may or may not pan out, but was supposed to be NFL star ready?
     
    Hooligan likes this.
  3. cbrad

    cbrad . Club Member

    8,498
    9,999
    113
    Dec 21, 2014
    As I said, few QB's "get their mechanics and mind right" when it's as bad as Allen's was. That's often the most difficult part. You shouldn't just ignore that argument. The NFL is littered with physically gifted QB's that couldn't get their mechanics or mind right. Anyone suggesting they thought Allen was going to succeed after posting the 2nd worst passer rating his rookie year with terrible accuracy better prove that with a link to a post of theirs because almost no one thought Allen would make it.

    And some of the most successful QB's in history weren't that physically gifted. Adjusted to a common year, Young is the most efficient QB's in history passer rating wise. He didn't have a strong arm and his performance was terrible his first two years. But ultimately his decision making ability made him one of the best QB's in history. Montana was also known for a weak arm and he's 2nd on the all-time list. So even without impressive physical tools you can be one of the best if you have high accuracy and good decision making ability.

    No one here can say Tua can't develop that. In fact he was known for his accuracy in college. As has been often pointed out here it's his decision making that needs work. There are MANY cases where QB's developed that with experience. That's why you have to give Tua (and almost any rookie QB) another year at the very least to see if he develops. ONLY if they don't show any signs of improvement do you then start to seriously question if they're the right QB.
     
    Pauly, JJ_79 and RevRick like this.
  4. RevRick

    RevRick Long Haired Leaping Gnome Club Member

    7,133
    3,851
    113
    Nov 25, 2007
    Thomasville, GA
    I seem to recall a lot of people writing similar thoughts and recommendations for Tannehill on one of this boards predecessors some few yeas back. We used to have a saying that resembled these thoughts...... Something about babies and bathwater.
     
  5. Rick 1966

    Rick 1966 Professional Hipshooter

    7,281
    2,759
    113
    Nov 23, 2007
    Lakeland, FL

    Young didn't excel until his third team (second NFL team).
     
  6. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

    7,523
    9,774
    113
    Nov 1, 2009
    Caught this on Facebook; interesting perspective-

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Hooligan

    Hooligan Season Ticket Holder Club Member

    306
    367
    63
    Dec 31, 2018
    Costa Rica
    The only thing those stats tell us is that they mean absolutely nothing. The guy with the worst numbers is taking his team to the conference championship game and maybe the SB. There are so many other factors in play. What is their ceiling after 9 games? Obviously Allen was nowhere near his ceiling. Tua, on the other hand is already being touted for his accuracy and decision making, not too much room for improvement there, nor is he going to get much bigger, faster, stronger.
    After seeing the latest QB out of Alabama, Jones, with better numbers, better size coupled with his performance in the National Title game and, no glaring injury history, would anybody choose Tua over Jones if given a choice? Actually one mock that I saw had the Patriots taking Jones at 16. Next season will be interesting.
     
  8. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

    7,523
    9,774
    113
    Nov 1, 2009
    What the stats "show" is that you can't make a true evaluation after 9 games. Cam has had several MVP-like seasons and took his team to the Super Bowl (twice or three times? I think twice.). Allen is having an incredible year. Darnold is leaning towards being a bust but he's also had some quality game film- the book is still out on that.

    Then there's Tua, who played safe and produced an "okay season" where he likely cost us 1 or 2 critical wins. There's just no way we can say his fate is decided today.
     
  9. smahtaz

    smahtaz Pimpin Ain't Easy Club Member

    I wasn't a big fan of drafting an injured player. Same with Parker. That being said, I thought Tua played pretty well. I'm to the point that all I want to see is a team that has a chance to win every week. I'm done sweating who's doing it.
     
    mlb1399 likes this.
  10. cbrad

    cbrad . Club Member

    8,498
    9,999
    113
    Dec 21, 2014
    Cam has been a huge disappointment for someone taken #1. He's been either around average or below average as a passer except for one year (2015) where he came in #7 in passer rating. That was the year he helped take his team to the SB and won MVP (he went to the SB only once btw).

    With his running ability you have to raise his overall value, but overall his production has been just about average.

    This was one eval I got right btw, though in 2015 I had to cringe a bit because I thought maybe I was wrong. But someone with great physical traits without the accuracy or good decision making just can't cut it ultimately.

    Anyway, not arguing against your overall point that you can't evaluate a QB after 9 games, or just a rookie season, but Cam is more an example of failure than success. Right now it's only Allen you can point to as a potential long term success, though we'll see what happens to him over time.
     
    KeyFin likes this.
  11. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

    7,523
    9,774
    113
    Nov 1, 2009
    While I agree with you, if you gave me the choice of having our next QB have the same career as Cam or one that's completely different...I'd say to give us that Super Bowl MVP for one season and I'll hope that our defense can get us back there a few more times.

    Just in terms of raw ability, Cam Newton was one of the most enjoyable QB's I ever saw in his prime- which was probably 6+ years ago. He's the only QB I've ever seen that would look at a blitzing linebacker, brace for impact and then knock the defender to the ground like it was no big deal. Just super fun to watch since Cam doesn't take anything in life too seriously...in a way, I don't know if he's ever felt like he was "under pressure" in the pocket.
     
  12. texanphinatic

    texanphinatic Senior Member

    10,647
    3,867
    113
    Nov 26, 2007
    Detroit Metro Area MI
    IMO Newton was also done dirty by the league - the number of brutal hits he took as a passer without roughing calls was silly, and encouraged teams to go all out trying to knock him out.
     
    Hiruma78 and Puka-head like this.
  13. DolphinGreg

    DolphinGreg Season Ticket Holder Club Member

    4,710
    5,666
    113
    Dec 7, 2014
    I agree that Cam Newton is not the ideal QB to draft #1 overall.

    But, I think the fact that Colin Kaepernick and Cam Newton both made the Super and Lamar Jackson has (at times) made that Baltimore team look unstoppable shows you that there absolutely is another path. It may not be as sustainable as the traditional path, but it can definitely get you there.

    And while you can argue that the 49ers D helped Kaepernick and that the same was (to some extent) true with Newton and Jackson, the truth is no team makes the Super Bowl without a good defense.

    And you know, as crazy as it sounds, teams can almost become too productive for their own good at QB with the traditional passers. We've seen a lot of teams become overly-reliant on a star QB thinking he alone can make them relevant. Not only did it famously happen with Dan Marino, but we've seen it repeated many times in the modern era, too. You can have an elite QB and still not make a lot of Super Bowl appearances, just ask Green Bay, New Orleans and Indianapolis.
     

Share This Page