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Dolphins announce they will be staying inside for anthem

Discussion in 'Miami Dolphins Forum' started by Puka-head, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. Dol-Fan Dupree

    Dol-Fan Dupree Tank? Who is Tank? I am Guy Incognito. Club Member

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    The state politicians are funded by the private prisons which many do have contracts that the state has to keep them at a certain percentage of the capacity.

    I would argue that one of the reasons the entire justice system is extremely efficient at locking up people and ensuring they stay "In the system" is due to the political power of the private prison lobby, which spends a lot of money to make sure that system is extremely efficient at keeping their pockets lined with money.
     
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  2. The_Dark_Knight

    The_Dark_Knight Defender of the Truth

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    The deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor were absolutely horrible. I don't care what position you take on the political spectrum left or right, no one in their right mind will attempt to rationalize or justify their deaths. To do so would be just idiotic. Based on my own professional law enforcement experience in the military, the charges filed against Derek Chauvin were indeed justified and in my own personal opinion he should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. As to the death of Breonna Taylor, that investigation needs to go all the way to the top...

    -A "no knock warrant": What local, state, federal law authorized this type of warrant?
    -What intelligence did the Louisville Police have that indicate Jamarcus Glover was Taylor's home to issue the warrant?
    -What intelligence did the Louisville Police have on who else besides Glover was in Taylor's home?
    -What risk assessment was evaluated on potentially armed/unarmed persons at said residence?

    To a degree, I don't blame the officers as much as the operation they were ordered to execute. Being in the army, you can have an OP O go south due to bad intelligence. You can't blame the soldiers executing the op...they're just trying to survive and the same goes with these police officers to a degree. You can't blame the officers that carried out this order without first questioning those who issued that order. Bottom line, who ever screwed this up also needs to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

    I have to respectfully disagree with you here Brandon. There have been other social justice issues that were rectified by means of peaceful protest, Women's Suffrage and the Civil Rights come to mind.

    Susan B Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Alice Paul are just a few examples of women who through non-violent civil disobedience and protest effected change to social norms and the adoption of 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote. There were no riots, there was no looting, there was no violence on the part of the women who protested. They, in that particular point in time of social norms, were in the minority and had no power. That was reserved to men and yet, they fought through peaceful protest for their right to vote.

    The civil rights movement of the 60's was led and inspired by the likes of Martin Luther King, Medgar Evers, Rosa Parks and Malcolm X. While King and Evers urged peaceful demonstration and non-violent civil disobedience, Malcom X aligned himself initially with Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam who asserted that violence was an acceptable form of protest with Malcom X being one of its prominent figures and his famous quote "By any means necessary". It wasn't until Malcom X's pilgrimage to Mecca during the Haj did he learn that many of the beliefs he learned from the Nation of Islam were in direct conflict with true Islam and left the nation of Islam, following suit with MLK in peaceful protest. The Greensboro Sit-in, The Selma March, the March of Washington all led to other non-violent protests, marches and sit ins that resulted in the Civil Rights Act.

    Rioting, looting, violence are not at all necessary to effect social change if your message and your cause or grounded in fact and morally sound. [/QUOTE]

    "So called United States of America"...divisive language such as this does little to effect social change and constructive dialogue as it demonstrates an already set in stone mindset. Now this is not a shot at you personally Brandon so please don't take it that way. This may be your feelings; I know it's certainly the feeling of many in the US but as long as we are incapable of actually extending the olive branch and try to have an open, candid, objective and constructive discussion to address regresses on all sides of the argument, no positive change will ever come.

    I personally feel that black lives matter...
    I personally feel that ALL black lives matter...
    I personally feel that ALL lives matter...including "yours"

    Life is life; people are people and EVERY person in the US has the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. If we as the human race can't all agree to this simple principle, then how in the world are we ever going to mend the differences that separate us?

    Sadly, political rancor ad posturing trumps social healing and recovery. If it didn't, there wouldn't be the need for the Dolphins to stay in the locker room. People would actually talk WITH one another instead of talking AT one another.
     
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  3. The_Dark_Knight

    The_Dark_Knight Defender of the Truth

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    :link: ???
     
  4. Finatik

    Finatik Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Where is the personal responsibility? If you don't want to go to prison for drugs, here's an idea, don't do drugs. If you don't want to get caught again, don't hang out with people who do drugs as this might just not be the best people to get you're life moving in the right direction. Why is it always someone else's fault. Who's MAKING them commit these crimes? Twisting their arms? Forcing them? There's an old saying that is still true. Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.

    In the Floyd case he's high on meth and fentanyl. Was put into the cop car where he became enraged and was taken out of the car to get him under control (didn't see any of that until recent tapes have come out). Maybe he shouldn't have stuck a gun in a pregnant lady's belly when he robbed her (another ex con). And yes his violent past does count when they run his name and find out he's a danger. Maybe his life choices could have been better and he wouldn't have been in the situation he was in. Where's the personal accountability for his actions that directly led him to his path. Not excusing that the cop should have or could have handled it differently. Floyd put himself in that situation being a junkie and a armed robber. But now he's got portraits painted of him. I guess it's the systems fault.

    Rashard Brooks was wasted and passed out in a Wendy's drive thru. Ex con on parole realizes he's going back to jail and fights 2 cops over powering them. Steals one of their weapons. Tries to shoot a cop in the face with weapon. Those were his choices that led him down that path. No one made him pass out, beat up 2 cops and steal a weapon and tried to shoot the cop with said weapon. He got shot because the cop was racist I guess. None of the event prior matter. Where's the personal accountability for his actions??

    I guess it's always the "systems fault" now, because there just isn't any personal responsibility or self control. It's just easier to blame it on the "system" and "oppression" then to look at this and say these martyres brought most of it down around their heads by their personal actions. If either of them hadn't been high and physically fought the police, guess what??? they wouldn't be dead now. But it's racism and the systems fault. That's the easy answer now.
     
  5. Dol-Fan Dupree

    Dol-Fan Dupree Tank? Who is Tank? I am Guy Incognito. Club Member

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  6. The_Dark_Knight

    The_Dark_Knight Defender of the Truth

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    I don't believe that's what he's suggesting at all. I believe Rick and I both believe that massive government programs than hand out money for nothing do nothing to elevate folks out of poverty. In fact, it tends to keep them in poverty. We as a nation have done the same thing year after year for the last 50 years and the poverty rate has remained constant, if not increased.

    Education and lucrative job training in a high demand field are the keys to elevating anyone out of poverty.
     
  7. Dol-Fan Dupree

    Dol-Fan Dupree Tank? Who is Tank? I am Guy Incognito. Club Member

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    :link:

    well from a non-conservative think tank.

    I love education and lucrative job training as much as the next guy, but most of the time I see programs where the government gives out money for nothing to do nothing it helps people get out of poverty.
     
  8. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    Really? People getting government assistance often can't have an actual job, as that income will cause them to lose that assistance, even if they can't survive on that job alone. If having a job causes you to lose your housing, because your income causes you to not qualify, and you won't be able to afford housing with your job, that seems counter to bringing people out of poverty. Just one example.
     
  9. Dol-Fan Dupree

    Dol-Fan Dupree Tank? Who is Tank? I am Guy Incognito. Club Member

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    That's not money for nothing. That is money for not working. That part of government assistance needs to be fixed. If you penalize people for getting a job, of course they are not going to get a job.

    Edit: I am agreeing with you that what you are saying is a problem.
     
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  10. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I think you're missing a much larger point- are you saying that you (or your childhood friends) never once drove drunk, smoked pot, stole something, vandalized something, etc? If folks here are 100% honest, most of us break petty laws every single day of our lives.

    Yet when you're in a crime-riddled area, you often go to jail for being in the wrong place at the wrong time...LITERALLY. Oh, you were in your friend's car that had a potential stolen laptop in it? Everyone's going to jail. You were out at 2 AM in a high crime area? You're getting pulled over every few blocks and delayed for hours. Don't get mad about it either, we're just protecting and serving...that attitude gets you a night in county and possible assault charges.

    I never once said, "Feel sorry for actual criminals." That's not the vast majority of people in jail though...far from it.

    In Floyd's case (since you brought it up), he was detained in a police vehicle....there was nothing more to do but take him to jail. You're acting like people being arrested should smile and thank the officers for doing their civic duty- that's not how the world works, my friend. Of course he was angry- he was being arrested on suspicion of passing counterfeit money...which he may or may not have realized was counterfeit (if he passed it at all). In no reality does that deserve a death sentence. An experienced, veteran cop would have let Floyd throw his temper tantrum in the car, get it out of his system and then take him to jail...if he damages the car, then file more charges.

    Again, you're completely missing the point here....I could care less what Floyd did in his life before that day. Nobody deserves to die over a fake $20 and being high is not against the law. Honestly, there was no reason to even approach him that night since they knew who he was and they could have investigated and arrested him at a later time. Because here's the crux of the problem....prove that was his 20 and that he passed it with criminal intent. There's no way that ever gets prosecuted in the first place.

    Floyd's life was worth less than a fake $20...that's what all the uproar is all about. If you think about the person in this world that you like the least, would you pay $20 for them to escape instant death? One way or the other, your answer will prove my point here that you're not thinking this thru.
     
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  11. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    So where I've started to question things in regards to Floyd...knee on the neck is an actual restraint that those officers are trained in. Initially, I looked at that at outrageous, and certainly must have been outside of protocol. Turns out, it isn't. Then, you factor in the fentanyl that he ingested, and the the meth, and it increasingly looks like there's a good chance that Chauvin didn't actually kill him...or there is at least reasonable doubt.

    Really it is an intricate situation.
     
  12. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I agree with you, but ultimately in the media circus one of those things happened- either the officer used an illegal tactic that resulted in death, or the academy is training officers to kill people with questionable techniques. Neither is publicly acceptable and when you throw in that this happened for almost 10 minutes with a non-responsive person in custody, I do think that's murder. And like I said, I may in fact be wrong on that opinion...but public perception and the police agency trying to cover their own butts takes this case to a different level.

    In SC, I remember my first training academy where we were practicing headlocks...I got screamed at because I was choking my partner. And I remember thinking, it's a headlock...how the heck does a big guy use a headlock on someone smaller and not potentially cut off blood supply or air? I would have never used that in a prison unless I was fighting for my life because I'm so big/strong.

    Another thing we were taught in the academy though is that we were first responders 1st, officers 2nd (I actually ran the cafeteria, so I was kitchen supervisor 2nd and an officer only in bad situations). If an inmate was in distress, my job was to drop everything and provide aid (or get help) because we were responsible...that inmate was in custody of the state and everything that happened to him/her fell on us while they were locked up. We were trained to consider the legal implications of not taking action because it could be a huge deal...that's one of the many reasons I got out of that profession.
     
  13. Finatik

    Finatik Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Never said you felt sorry for actual criminals. It's a larger point about society that there is no personal accountability for ones actions and they get a free pass.

    Being high on meth and fentanyl and counterfeiting isn't petty. Either is armed robbery which shows he has a potential for violence. So to answer your question, no I don't smoke crack or meth and have never committed armed robbery. I might have drove drunk but if the cops pulled me over I wouldn't be on parole and I think I wouldn't be fighting with them. Maybe

    Get violent with the police and they shoot you. White, black, brown it doesn't matter. They have to go home without injury or death too. Blue lives matter. They are protesting right now because a cop killed a guy. Mental problems comes out of the house with a knife and chased the cop until he got shot. Sorry but chase a cop with a knife you get shot. Actions have consequences. Personal responsibility for actions needs to be front and center. But that's just me.
     
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  14. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    There is a third option: fentanyl and meth killed him.
     
  15. DolphinGreg

    DolphinGreg Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    What I find refreshing is that people can converse about this stuff in ways that expose the common sense on both sides. Contrary to what you hear in the media, conversations are happening and minds are being changed. Much of that happens on the interwebs however. It doesn't happen with talking heads.

    What we can't seem to get right is the media coverage. Media seems to love controversy and so it supports one-sided takes. For instance, does anyone here actually mind if the Dolphins players put together some unifying demonstration? Probably not. That's their privilege. And as young (mostly African-American) males, it's understandably a top priority for them. These are young men, many of whom feel a connection to the current movement in some way, shape or form. That's relatable and easily tolerable even among those who don't see their concern as the most pressing issue facing the country.

    What disgusts me are the commentators who have to report on who knelt and who didn't as if that is the thing that's important. Media has become so meta it's ridiculous. Media coverage in America seems to be somewhere between evil and mind-numbingly stupid. The latter is probably worse because it's unpredictable.
     
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  16. The_Dark_Knight

    The_Dark_Knight Defender of the Truth

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    I understand what you’re getting at regarding the fentanyl but the video evidence is overwhelming. Video clip #1 shows Floyd in cuffs being sat on the sidewalk. He’s restrained. Video clip#2 shows him in the ground next to the police vehicle, Chauvin’s knee on his neck, full body weight which is illustrated by the free movement of his right foot.

    Now from a trained law enforcement point of view, Floyd is restrained, 4 officers present, vehicle present...Floyd should have been placed in the back of the vehicle. The fight is over. He’s restrained. There’s nothing he can do to cause physical harm.

    Now unless there’s other video showing Floyd doing his impression of Morpheus or John Wick that called for him being slammed to the pavement with Chauvin’s knee on his neck to restrain him, you’re going to have a hard time convincing me there was ever a need for a restrained suspect being planted face down on the pavement for 8 plus minutes rather than tossing him in the back of the vehicle.
     
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  17. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    Yeah man, that's where I was when I first saw the video when it came out. However, take it with a grain of salt, but the medical report released by the PD said there was no bruising in the neck or back, so the cause of death wasn't asphyxiation. Then finding out that they are trained to immobilize buy kneeling on the neck, and finding out that Floyd ingested a usually lethal dose of fentanyl and meth, just prior to the attempted arrest, it casts a lot of doubt into the situation for me, as to what actually caused his death.
     
  18. Ronnie Bass

    Ronnie Bass Luxury Box Luxury Box

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    Lets not take this thread really off-topic by debating what happened to George Floyd, there is a 100% chance of this getting ugly.
     
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  19. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    If that's actually what happened (and I'm not saying it didn't...we don't know), then that officer may go to jail for manslaughter nonetheless. Remember, his 1st responsibility is to provide aid, THEN arrest. So he's liable either way...all of those officers were.

    I'm a big "back the blue" type of guy but in this case, they straight up blew it.
     
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  20. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Back up...how do you know he was counterfeiting? And if he did try to pass a counterfeit bill, why'd the clerk accept it without saying a word? That's why everyone has due process under the law. With the Floyd case, you can't say "actions have consequences" because he was high. Again, this was over $20...he died over twenty dollars.

    I back the blue as well- the guy who came out with a knife and rushed the police needed to be shot dead...there's nothing to think about there.
     
  21. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I'll be honest- my opinion has 100% changed over the past few months. I'll always be on law enforcement's side but at the same time, we have to change a system that's set up to target poverty-stricken areas where people just don't have a fair chance at living the American Dream. It took some hard conversations for me to realize that I was only seeing part of the picture and ignoring everything else.
     
  22. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    Of course, those poverty areas are targeted because they are high in crime. It's like a never ending cycle. But, I think drug laws are a huge problem there.
     
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  23. Finatik

    Finatik Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    If you think him be wacked out on a lethal level dose of Fentanyl and meth had no bearing on what happened, then that's what you believe. I don't want to debate the Floyd situation as this isn't what this very good conversation is about. Let's not ruin it. Cheers brother.
     
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  24. AGuyNamedAlex

    AGuyNamedAlex Well-Known Member

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    I mean, I dont really care what he was high on. The actions in question happened after he was in control and successfully detained.

    He could have been high on crack, meth, pcp, lsd, dmt and bath salts. The point where that could have impacted the outcome had been passed.
     
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  25. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    One other thing, and this is where I really disagree with the general sentiment, I guess, is he didn't die over a fake 20. He died from his actions following involvement of the police. Like, he didn't have to ingest a lethal level dose, he chose to. He didn't have to then also ingest meth, he chose to. Not doing those two things, I think it's highly likely that he's alive today. Those actions then lead to other violent actions, eventually culminating in his death. But if it's actually the drugs that killed him (really it was the drugs either by sitting down guess system, per by causing him to have his violent outburst), then all this energy and effort has been spent trying to prove police misconduct, with a case that actually had no misconduct. Know what I mean? But there is zero way anyway anyone will actually have that conversation. I'm sure I'll get some interesting responses. It's just too bad, because I do believe that there needs to be some police reform, but I feel like the message will be lost because the case they're using to make it isn't accurate.
     
  26. AGuyNamedAlex

    AGuyNamedAlex Well-Known Member

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    I can tell you why. The rules are entirely arbitrary. You can't even make a case they arent. Cross any state lines and you're under an entirely new set of laws that might or might not conflict with laws in your own state.

    I don't particularly remember consenting to any set of laws. I was again arbitrarily placed under them by being born.

    If a law hurts noone, why on Earth would I follow the arbitrary ruleset I dont agree with and never consented to? Who gets to decide what is bad for me?
     
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  27. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    That's the thing- you get more crime, you get more cops, which leads to more youth caught up in an area with limited opportunity. Nobody wins in that situation and cops/community simply grow further apart. It sucks because like you said, it's a full cycle that never ends and only gets worse with the next generations.

    My brother (who was adopted at birth to a different family, just like me) came from one of those areas and I moved him up here last year to help him escape that cycle...he's been in jail almost half his adult life. And at first, he'd brag about how much street cred he had, how much pot he's sold, how many people looked up to him, etc like those are cool things we all aspire to...him and I were in two different galaxies in terms of world views. But then he saw how my family lives and how successful I've been, and everything changed for him almost instantly. He's now managing a trendy restaurant and living a great life...but it was something that he couldn't even fathom 18 months ago since it wasn't a part of his world.

    The thing is, he was raised in poverty without a dad in the picture...that story is way too common these days and he never got those lectures how he could be anything he wanted to be in this world. From the age of 13 he literally thought selling pot was the only path to success in the world he lived in...because that's what all his "friends" did. My brother is a GREAT guy as well- loyal, dependable and trustworthy...he just didn't have a freakin' chance because of how/where he was raised.

    Although my brother is white, I think his story is now the BLM story....there's so many here in America that can't see where college, a tech school or a serious career can ever be an option. These aren't bad people either; they're simply a product of their environments and that's where change HAS TO start...just showing those in that situation that there's ways to escape poverty and live a great life.

    For instance, a lot of folks don't know this but a four-year state university education costs less than incarcerating someone for four years. In South Carolina, we house inmates the cheapest nationwide at $17k a year...and that's barely feeding them at all. I can't help but think of how many hundreds of thousands of petty offenders could be shown a different path early on if resources are directed away from prison and into communities for education, counseling, etc...that's where this has to start. But I don't know how we get there with the nation's leadership in general (all parties) since they don't truly understand the problem.
     
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  28. Dol-Fan Dupree

    Dol-Fan Dupree Tank? Who is Tank? I am Guy Incognito. Club Member

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    They are also "rented out" to call centers and many other places for employment for extremely low wages, depress the earning potential of everyone in the region because it is hard to compete against far below minimum wage, and the income that is provided doesn't go out into the community. Thus creating more poverty, thus creating more of this cycle.

    I think you have a good point about his story being a BLM story because this is also about class as much as it is about race.
     
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  29. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I haven't worked for the state in about a dozen years, but the average inmate on work release made minimum wage at one of many low-wage positions. Only, because they were allowed to work, they had to "pay" like $25/day for their room/board plus transportation costs to/from work, plus restitution and other fees. Inmates ended up with around $1.21 an hour take home and these guys had to work like dogs to keep their jobs in some really bad conditions (for instance, we were a huge employer at a local chicken slaughterhouse).

    But here's the thing- you can earn zero per week working in the prison or $40 a week getting to leave every day, have co-workers bring you a few cigarettes and a cold Pepsi, etc...which do you choose? It's not even worth the thought- inmates wait in line for years to earn that $40 that comes with a sliver of freedom.
     
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  30. Finatik

    Finatik Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I grew up in Santa Ana in the ghetto area. Gang infested. Nightly shootings. Single mother who did what she could to keep a roof over our heads and food on our plates. I knew I wanted better. So I worked 2 jobs and went to community college at the same time. Rode my skateboard to school cause we didn't have a car. Worked for minimum wage in a warehouse and a pizza joint. And sometimes at Irvine Meadows at nights during concerts. Did whatever it took. Not real galmerious and I had zero time left to do other things but sleep. Just like anyone else can/could. It's choices we make in life. Sometimes those choices are made for you but there comes a time, where at the cross road, you become responsible for you own life through your own actions. "The system does this to me", "Some group oppressed me", "I'm not being treated fairly"....all a bunch of excuses to me since I was also in the gutter once. So sorry if I don't have a lot of empathy for all the hard luck stories. I lived it.
     
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  31. The_Dark_Knight

    The_Dark_Knight Defender of the Truth

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    But isn't this one of the incidents being protested by NFL players kneeling during the National Anthem? Isn't a dialogue what's being called for?

    And in all honesty, I don't believe a discussion about George Floyd would ugly. I'm one of the staunchest conservatives here and even I am calling for Chauvin's prosecution as I illustrated above.
     
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  32. Ronnie Bass

    Ronnie Bass Luxury Box Luxury Box

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    Most conservatives are, when video first surfaced I was kinda stunned how many of my most ardent pro-cop friends were calling for Chauvin's head on a stick, no one was defending his actions. This should have been a turning point (and hopefully still is) but I fear the radical left blew that chance up with the riots and it's a shame.
     
  33. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I'm not saying to be sorry for anyone- hard luck story or not. But you of all people know how hard you had to work despite your environment to live a better life. I mean, was that common in your neighborhood- kids working 2-3 jobs to pay their way thru college? You know as well as anyone that you were an exception to the rule because of your work ethic and desire.

    I pretty much have the same story- dropped out of college when my dad almost died and I needed to help with the bills, but I had always had 1-2 jobs since the day I was 16. I did have a stable middle class home though in a low crime area and a quality high school education...which some would call a "head start" on your experiences.

    The truth here though is that this isn't about you or me...we turned out fine in life. Far too many don't make it to where we are though and something has to change to flip that trend. It's not a knock on you because you did EXCEPTIONAL with limited resources, it's a knock on the communities because more didn't follow in your footsteps (or even know that it was an option in the 1st place).

    In other words, your path in life is extraordinary...it's tough to hold everyone to those standards as kids and expect them to thrive.
     
  34. resnor

    resnor Derp Sherpa

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    But, just for sake of discussion, IF it turns out that Chauvin did not kill him by kneeling on his neck, but that it was the fentanyl and meth, doesn't that change everything? It would then mean that the police did nothing wrong, and therefore all the rioting and looting was not justified. How can a guy dying from a drug overdose be a turning point regarding police brutality?
     
  35. Puka-head

    Puka-head My2nd Fav team:___vs Jets Club Member

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    Slightly left of center
    Here is a link to the numbers:

    https://www.opensecrets.org/industries/indus.php?ind=G7000

    In the 2016 election cycle, private prisons gave a record $1.6 million to candidates, parties and outside spending groups. That was nearly triple what they'd given in 2014 and more than double their contributions in the 2012 presidential cycle. Most of the increase came in the form of donations to outside groups, and Geo Group was responsible for most of that: It gave $300,000 to super PACs backing various Republican presidential candidates, including one backing now-President Donald Trump.
     
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  36. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    That's a huge part of the problem- people on either "side" can be just in their reasoning, but end up being 100% wrong due to their actions in seeking justice/reform. This whole thing is a power keg and so many are dying to "light the match", so I'm really glad we are having these conversations in a mostly civil manner. I'm very passionate about this stuff.
     
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  37. Ronnie Bass

    Ronnie Bass Luxury Box Luxury Box

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    Did nothing wrong? If a cop was kneeling on your neck, are you going to go with "he did nothing wrong"?
     
  38. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    Regardless of verdict, I don't think this conversation dies down any time soon....especially with the COVID restrictions around the globe. For instance, I'm soooooo ready to take a cruise and sit my fat *** on a pool deck eating gourmet burgers and steaks, but that's no longer a reality. So I think we all have a lot more time to find things to say and talk about social causes.

    If it does come out with an innocent verdict or charges get dropped, I think this conversation gets A LOT worse. The anger is based on perception and George Floyd was just one in a long line of questionable deaths recently. Again, I back the blue 100%...but I think we've passed that tipping point where these types of incidents will be tolerated without protests, violence, etc.
     
  39. Ronnie Bass

    Ronnie Bass Luxury Box Luxury Box

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    It's not black and white and that's the mistake everyone makes when it comes to condemning the other side because today's climate is so polarized that critical thinking gets pushed aside and blind demonization takes its place.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
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  40. KeyFin

    KeyFin Season Ticket Holder Club Member

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    I completely agree- both sides have valid viewpoints and I can make an argument for either one. My personal beliefs fall somewhere in the middle though...we have to support the police while also standing by communities as well.
     
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